Figurative Sculptures

The collection ‘Figurative Sculptures’ in Terra Delft Gallery consists of artworks which are interpretations of tangible reality. There is a mix of already-familiar ‘Terra’ artists and new faces.

Stephanie Roos makes her debut at Terra with realistic sculptures whose presentation is quotidian and contemporary. The well-known voluminous ‘ladies’ by Evelyn van Baarda are decorated with pastel and lustre accents, applied with her refined brush. Janssens’ sculptures are reserved yet have an enormously expressive quality due to the subject. The use of paint and other materials make the sculptures less ‘ceramic’ and more ‘mixed media’.

A second newcomer is Elisabeth Hangoor who, just as the artists named above, has ‘the human’ as her subject. Her sculptures are modest in size, and demure. Like Marc Janssens, she sometimes adds other materials. Louise Hindsgavl literally lets realism swing in her series ‘Face the music and dance’. Her glossy glazed porcelain is thus less classical.

Animals, too, feature in this exhibition. Peter Hiemstra’s absurdist and fabulous work is colorful and demands attention. In his work, many different ceramic techniques are employed in order to come to mixture of human and animal. In terms of style, the monochrome creatures by Caroline Andrin are more difficult to describe. Their origins lie in casts of loosely-sewn gloves. Saskia Pfaeltzer’s work is dynamic and full of action. Her series of rolling horses shows her talent to portray this joyful reality.